Tea Biz
Tea Biz

Episode · 1 year ago

Tea News and Biz Insight - April 2, 2021

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

HEAR THE HEADLINES – | Suez Ship-jam Delays Tea Deliveries | Tea Aisle Sales Stand Out in Grocery | Tea Retail Realignment is Underway 

| GUEST – David O'Neill director of Falls of Clyde International, a maritime heritage non-profit with plans to state clipper tea races in 2025. 

| FEATURES – This week Tea Biz visits Scotland for a lesson on the history of tea clipper ships and a plan to revive the famous tea races from China to the UK with next-generation zero-emission sail craft that someday may enable shippers who switched from sail to steam 150 years ago to switch back to sail again…. and we explore a realm that knows no bounds -- the imagination of tea book authors. Listen as Kyle Whittington, founder of the Tea Book Club, presents the first in a series of crowd-sourced book reviews. 

Clipper Tea Races Reborn

Racing 2000-ton, 200-foot long, four-masted tall ships with a 30-man crew at speeds of up to 32 kilometers per hour from Foochow, China to London was a 99-day spectacle that rivaled today’s FIFA World Cup. With a ten-pence per ton premium on top of the 5 pounds per ton price of tea and a cash prize of 100 sterling for the first captain to reach port, the race (and wagers in plenty) meant fortunes won and lost. From the first race in 1865 to the last in

1872 the public eagerly anticipated September when a glut of fresh tea first arrived. British and American clipper ships were the marvel of their day but Scotland’s shipbuilders in Aberdeen on the River Clyde were the most renowned.

The race of 1866 pitted 57 ships on a journey of 14,000 miles with three contenders arriving within two hours on the same tide. The world’s two fastest clippers, the Taeping and the Ariel docked 28 minutes apart, the winning captain gallantly splitting the prize. David O’Neill is director of Falls of Clyde International, a non-profit vested in preserving Scotland’s maritime heritage. The 200-foot-long Falls of Clyde is the last of the full-rigged iron-hulled clippers. It is designated a US National Historic Landmark and moored as a maritime museum in Honolulu. However, it is no longer open to the public and needs $1.5 million in immediate repairs or it will be scuttled. 

The Tea Book Club

The Tea Book Club is a virtual adaptation of the Saturday afternoon tea and armchair get-togethers we all miss. Members meet monthly as either “Teapot” regulars or just a “Spoon-full” drop-ins. A new book is introduced every two months. The first session is social with a book-related theme or special guest. The second meet-up is to discuss the book in detail. There are two time slots to accommodate the global community with recordings available and a group chat on Instagram. Email prompts during the month help you keep on pace. In this segment, Kyle introduces the club’s favorite book of 2020, Tales of the Tea Trade by Michelle and Bob Comins, two adventurous tea retailers from Bath, England who recount their travels to origin. 

The Tea Biz podcast delivers tea news that you need to know, a recap of the week's major headlines, with commentary and cultural trends. Hosted by Danpole, is the voice of origin for tea professionals enthusiast the world. Byle think of us as a digital caravan of storytellers, bringing authentic, authoritative, exotic and exclusive stories to you weekly from the tea lads. Each week, the tea bis podcast summarizes news with the greatest impact on the tea industry. But Tea requires far more nuanced coverage than the recitation of production volumes and commodity prices. That is why the tea Biz podcast is paired with the more inclusive tea Biz blog and tea journey magazine. The podcast offers a weekly mix of news and features. It is innovative and interactive, permitting listeners to conveniently contact reporters at origin to ask questions that are answered via text messages that are delivered privately to their phone. Welcome in Happy Easter. This weekend is also King Meing, a Chinese festival honoring ancestors, and it's the official start of the tea season. Here's the headlines. Suez ship jam delays tea deliveries. Tile sales stand out in grocery and a te retail realignment is under way. More in a minute. The first this important message. Avani empowers rural women practicing sustainable agriculture, including tea, and crafts such as weaving with natural fiber and plant base dies up in the towering Hillalayas human is one of India's oldest tea regions.

Today, we raise our cups in the name of Avani Quman, a nonprofit dedicated to strengthening farming communities. Cheers to a brighter future for all. To donate, visit Avani da Quman Dot Org. The reliability of ships arriving on time was a record lows before the March twenty four Suez Canal ship jam delayed a significant amount of coffee and tea bound mainly for Europe. The van Riese Group, based in Rotterdam, continues to track eighty containers of tea on fifteen vessels that remain stalled or were rerouted at see logistics firm sea intelligence estimates a rival reliability to clide to thirty five percent in February and reports an average delay of six point seven six days, the highest delay ever. refloating the gigantic container ship ever given averted chaos as supplies at year end dwindled. But recovery will take a few weeks as three hundred and fifty ships make their way through the canal at a pace of eighty ships per day. The blockage will also prevent empty shipping containers from being returned to Asia, adding to a container shortage caused by rising demand for consumer goods during the panic business inside. In the orderly world of logistics, nothing is going as planned. Ports are designed to unload ships at an even pace. Hundreds of vessels arriving all at once at the same western European destinations will create bottlenecks at terminals and Antwerp, Rotterdam and Hamburg, where most tea is offloaded. Port authorities say they are now experiencing a lull before the rush. He stands out in the grocery isle,...

...stayed and Steady Center isle. Categories like tea rarely accelerated growth rates faster than advertising dribven fan us moving consumer goods categories. But that's exactly what happened in two thousand and twenty last April. Sales of tea bags and US Grocery and department stores grew by twelve percent year over year. According to Chicago based market research firm IRI, growth held steady at twelve point three percent for the year. Sales of tea and tea bags told of two hundred and fifty million dollars in the fifty two weeks ending February, two thousand and twenty one. In Canada, hot tea sales grew by eighteen percent through January, compared to eleven percent growth in fast moving goods overall, according to Nielsen research shared by the tea and Herbal Association of Canada. Globally, sales of package goods and beverages have fully recovered to pre pandemic levels. Business inside consumer surveys show that comfort and relaxation and lifestyle reasons in general motivate tea purchases, with immunity and mental health and Jose keeping warm among the top five reasons people bought tea during lockdowns. Consumer trends towards self care and convenience are now more prominent than in lass your surveys, but the desire to spend more to indulge in premium tea and to create pleasant in home experiences remains strong overall. The US economy is still troubled. On Wednesday, the Conference Board reported that sixty two percent of US consumers, many of whom are facing economic uncertainty and income loss, are cutting back on spending. Overall, for Galilee is one of three dominant priorities, along with a preference for digitally enabled convenience and spending on health and wellness.

...taught a consumer products owners of Tetley branded tea announced it has sold its stake in two US base joint tea ventures, parting ways with Empirical Group of Food Service Supplier and Harris Tea Company, Southern Tea Totta's CEOS. So the company is consolidating to sharpen his focus in the US coffee and tea market. Tetley is one of North America's highest grossing tea brands. Business inside. Kevin Gasco on, a partner and spokesman for Camelius and insist te retail in Montreal, writes the company will close its Emery Tea House after twenty two years. GASCOONE said that, like many firms, the pandemic forced the company to restructure and to reinvent itself to survive. Quote. In early two thousand and twenty two, we hope to present a new space is offering a completely different client experience, a location where tea tasting and discovery are at the core of each visit and quote. He said demand searched for a CTCT at the Coch et auction. Orthodox teas for export to the Middle East and CIS countries also rose. Green teas from the Nilgarres are also commanding higher prices, are Vinda in Bengaliu brings us this week's TA price report. This is a randwn and Tremond with India Price Watch for the week ending match twenty six, sale twelve. In coachee CTC dust enjoyed ninety one percent demand. The main buyers were Kala Supply Co and other packeteers Orthodox dust. So let's demand with bias from north India and a few exporters. The average price was a hundred and sixty four piece, fifteen pass, with nine percent unsold. Orthodox leaf. So good demand, with ninety three percent sold at an average price of hundred and seventy five piece, seventeen pass. The whole if Neil Kit is black tea found takers...

...among exporters to CEIAS countries and the Middle East come but though, also saw a higher leaf sale for Orthodox Tea, with nearly ninety three percent sold for an average price of hundred and seventy five or piece, twenty two pass a, while Kuno saw it is seven percent sold at an average price of hundred and fifty to piece, forty three per se for the same category. In the south, combine dust and leave saloes highest in Kochi for both average price and percentage sold. In City City Saltania combined saw two point eight million kilothes on offer, but seventy seven percent sold. Green tea commands better prices. A smaller volume of green tea, six hundred ninety one kilos was offered and five eighty eight kiloes picked up for an average price of two hundred and seventy apiece, forty three pessy. No tea was auctioned in not India last week. And now a word from our sponsor. Que trade teas works with tea preveyors and every scale, from promising start ups to the world's largest multi national beverage brands in the hot, iced and bound tea segments. With US based formulation, blending and packaging services. Que trade can help you innovate, the scale up and go your specialty tea brand. For more information, visit our website, que trade teas DOT COM. This week tea BIS visit Scotland for a lesson on the history of the tea clipper ships and a plan to revive the famous tea races from China to the U K with next generation zero emissions sale craft that may some day enable shippers who once switched from sale to steam a hundred and fifty years ago to switch back to sale again. And we explore a realm that knows no bounds, the imagination of tea book authors.

Listen as Kyle Whittington, founder of the Tea Book Club, presents the first in a series of crowdsource book reviews. The Tea Book Club is a virtual adaptation of the Saturday afternoon tea and arm chair get togethers we all miss. Members meet monthly as either tea pot regulars or just a spoonful drop INS. A new book is introduced every two months. The first session is social with a book related theme or Special Guest. The second meet up is to discuss the book in detail. There are two timeslots to accommodate the global community, with recordings available and a group chat on instagram. Email prompts during the month help you keep on pace. In this segment, Kyle introduces the club's favorite book of Twenty Twenty, tales of the tea trade by Michelle and Bob Cummings, two adventurous tea retailers from bath England who recount their traffics to urge. It was at this point that Mr Tushirajestured me to push my hand into the soil, which I didn't allow. Was Past his elbow. The lighter rated soil offered little resistance. On removing my arm, I was instructed to taste the soil, which I did without hesitation. How could something that was growing such healthy plants be anything but good for me? It tasted sweet, soft and gritty. If it hadn't been gritty, I probably have gone back for another handful. And that's a quote from tales of the tea trade by Michelle and Rob Commons, voted our favorite book of the year in October two thousand and twenty by Tea Book Club members. I'm Carl Whittington from the UK and founder of Tea Book Club, where an international group of tea lovers and readers who meet up online each month to discuss tea books. Tales of the tea trade was also shortlisted for the Andre Simon's Book Awards in Two Thousand and twenty.

Here my thoughts on the book. After general but thoughtfully written introduction to tea and its types, Michelle and rob take us on a journey to the different countries they source their tea from, taking turns to voice the stories we hear from both Michelle and rob, as well as the fascinating people they've met on their travels. This book is intensely human and heartfelt. You really feel a connection with Michelle and rob they love of tea, the places they go and the people they meet. The book is thoughtfully laid out so you know right away who is speaking and can easily pick out the stories from TP people. Alongside interesting asides such as baking their own newlong and people's relationships with tea. Countries are ranged in chronological order, based on when they started growing and producing tea. A different and thoughtful approach. The book is easy to hop in and out of reading sections that interest you. If you're not a cover to cover reader. Overall, a pleasure to read and a must add to any tea bookshelf. Now I'd also like to share with you some thoughts and comments from our members I have seen. Love the way they outline the book, the flow, and I love the bits at the end, such the meditation, a lovely way to finish it. Definitely the storytelling, the personal connection. They put a face to the tea, they put people to the tea. I really enjoyed the chapter on Korean tea. I've never had Korean tea before, so it was really nice to immerse myself in that world. I like the table where you can see and compare the different harvest times depending on where they are, and the different names of the picking seasons depending on where they are. Some things that came out of the book for our members. It made people more appreciative of the farmers, the work they put in and they care for the tea. Made them feel more mindful about the teas they buy. Another reader commented. Something that really got my attention was on tea preparation. They wrote that to taste tea really well requires people to have a quiet and compassionate heart. A good reminder that he requires one to be peaceful. If you'd like to join us by next Raet had of it's a teapot club dot oak, or joint teapot club on its grapple, racing two...

...thousand ton, two hundred foot long, four masted tall ships but a thirty man crew, at speeds of up to thirty two kilometers per hour. From who shall shine it to London was a ninety nine days spectacle that rivaled to day's feeful World Cup, with a ten pence per ton premium on top of the five pound per ton price of tea and a cash prize of a hundred sterling for the first captain to reach port. The race and wagers in plenty meant fortunes won and lost. From the first race in eighteen sixty five to the last in eighteen seventy two, the public eagerly anticipated September, when a glow of fresh tea first arrived. British and American clipper ships with a marvel of their day, but Scotland shipbuilders in Aberdeen on the River Clyde were the most renowned. The race of eighteen sixty six pitted fifty seven ships on a journey of fourteen thousand miles, with three contenders arriving within two hours on the same tide, the world's too fastest clippers that type, paying in the aerial dog twenty eight minutes apart the winning captain, gallantly splitting the prize. David O'Neil is director of folds of Clyde International, a nonprofit vested in preserving Scotland's maritime heritage. The two hundred foot long falls of Clyde is the last of the full rigged ironhulled clippers. It is designated a US national historic landmark and moored as a maritime museum and Honolulu. However, it is no longer open to the public and needs one point five million in immediate repairs or it will...

...be scuttled. I really see this project as a way to bring tea consumption to a global audience what it once was. It could attract global sponsors on a par with major ocean racing events and offer a boost to local communities and businesses in each of the cities along the way. Onder home and Portos. Exports, drawards, retail about and even tea drinkers and the media will follow us for reasons ranging from heritage tea of course, the environment and new technology is used in clean a mission shipping it under world. It will truly be a spectacle and interactive experience for many. David, who inspired you, the reservist, these famous races and I was around, I think, nine years old in primary school here in Glasgow, Scotland. We had a book book of adventures and stories and one of the episodes of you like that I picked up was a book in a series of the story of the cutty Sark versus the thermopoline, that story of adversity, man against the elements and US Clyde built super fast selling hip racing another one home to the UK. The story had excitement, disappointment, dangers and it captured the hugeness of the sea to me as an a year old kid and also showed how clever people could be and were able to be smart and innovative to solve problems. All suppose lessons that are learned in life and ones that I've actually passed on it more and kids. Or ship was built in Port Glasgo in one thousand eight hundred and seventy eight. Once she's returned to Scotland, shall be rebuilt to meet today's standard of structural integrity and to meet again safety standards from most modern chips. To celebrate her rebirth, work better way to show the world what Clyde built, the heritage means, and by recreating the t race this way, we get to promote cleaner mission shipping, as both vessels will be converted to all electric or hybrid clean fuel mix, and we see an opportunity to have this...

...as an annual event, challenging additional vessels each year to going and eventually aiming to have a launch fleet of sailing ships in the fit shore taking power all because of tea. Intrigued by what you heard in today's podcast, would you like to learn more from our global network of t Biz journalists and t experts? Contact them direct through subtext, private message based platform. Avoid the chaos of social media and start a conversation that matters. Subtext, message based platform let's you privately ask meaningful questions of the Texperts, academics and TB is journalists reporting from the teams. You see their responses via SMS texts which are sent to wrect here phone. visit our website subscribe to subtext instantly. Connected the most connected people in tea. Remember to visit the t Biz website for more comprehensive coverage. That's wwwft Biz bizcom. Thanks for listening. Farewell. Till next week.

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