Tea Biz
Tea Biz

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Tea News and Biz Insights - December 17, 2021

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HEAR THE HEADLINES – Bulk and Specialty Tea Prices Diverge, a TEAIN22 Forecast | France to Pay €1 Million to Certify Ceylon Tea | Bids total $8 Million HDK at Sotheby’s Inaugural Tea Auctions| NEWSMAKERS – Shekib Ahmed of Koliabur Tea Estate, Assam, India and Abhijeet Hazarika @TeaSigma | GUEST – Mary Cotterman, founder Mary Cotterman Pottery, Asheville, North Carolina, USA| FEATURES – This week, Tea Biz travels to Asheville, NC, to meet teaware potter and ceramist Mary Cotterman, who discusses the artisan spirit and state of mind of those embracing native clay and how COVID-19 lockdowns focused her attention like a monk.Then, to Assam, India, to hear Part 2 of the series Frugal Innovation. In this segment, Aravinda Anantharaman explores the application of Frugal Innovation in the tea garden and factories. Shekib Ahmed of Koliabur Tea Estate explains that "Objective data changes the conversation in the factory from vague concepts to thresholds and parameters. It makes operations scientific so that we can improve.”Born from Mud –In 2015 Mary moved to China to learn from the old masters how to make clay teapots in the style of Chaozhou Gongfu and to speak Mandarin. She spent two years there learning from a master in the Beijing school, becoming the first westerner to throw shou la hu teapots. She next studied at the Sanbao International Ceramics Village in Jingdezhen, the home of porcelain for 1700 years. She returned to the US in 2018 and makes her home in Asheville, North Carolina, where you will find her crafting water jars, pitchers, teacups, celadon gaiwans, and ash-glazed Japanese-style Kyusu teapots in a wood-fired kiln. - By Dan BoltonFrugal Innovation: In the Garden and Factories –Embracing Simple Technology with Scalable Impact | Frugal innovations utilize simple technology to address the most vexing challenges facing the tea industry. It's an umbrella term for innovations that do not require much capital, carry a low financial risk, and can be done safely with high reliability. For an industry that’s been grappling with multiple challenges, frugal innovation is a low-risk and impactful option, spearheaded by an industry veteran with an eye for innovation. For every successful experiment, many fail, but these are essential to the process that begins with the question, “What if…?" - By Aravinda Anantharaman

The tee Biz podcast delivers a recapof the week's major tea news headlines, with commentary and cultural trends. Hostedby Dan Bolton, Te Biz is the voice of origin for tea professionals andenthusiasts worldwide. Think of us as a digital caravan of story tellers, bringingauthentic, authoritative and exclusive stories to you weekly from the tea lands. Helloeveryone here. This week's headlines. Bulk and specialty tea prices diverge. Atea in twenty two forecast. France will pay one million euros to certify celong tea and SOTHOBIES. Inaugural tea auctions total eight million Hong Kong dollars.Don't miss part two of the serious frugal innovations later in the podcast. Morein a minute, but first this important message. What makes a Perfect Cupof Ceylon tea? The Perfect Cup is from the tea businesses that ensure theprotection of all the children living within their tea estates. We Salute Kailani Valley, tell a Wackilee, Bogajan, Thalawa, Harana and Elyptia tea, the estatessupport see the children. Shri Lanka tea in twenty two is the firstof a dozen New Year tea forecasts. The combined annual growth rate predicted fortea in two thousand and twenty two suggest consumer preferences for health enhancements and premiumtaste will widen. The profitability gap separating bulk CTC from whole leaf and specialtygrades. The fortunes of the tea industry are cyclical. Demand in recent decadeshas been resilient, including during a great recession, some would say relentless.During the five years ending two thousand and nineteen, demand grew at around fourpoint five percent per year. The pandemics flowed that pace. But consumption intwo thousand and twenty two will pop six point five billion kilos, enough tomake three billion cups a day. Until recently, growers managed to quench thatthirst, but disrupted that equilibrium. In Two thousand and twenty is that teaoutput decline for the first time in twenty years. The resulting scarcity in domesticmarkets, including India and China, boost at prices. I see R aa division of Moody's Financial Race. Meetings in October two thousand and twenty predictedcorrectly that the boat tea segment would report...

...the highest operating profits in recent history. In Two thousand and twenty one, the situation reversed as more tea becameavailable and prices decline. Compounding the supplied demand equilibrium is the fact that consumerbehavior rapidly changed. Consumption Habits as office drinkers vanished, food service sales plummetedand health and well being became a daily concern. The result, better tastingteas triumphed, once content with commodity offerings at the office and in restaurants.The pandemic accelerated growth in the residential segment. Sales of botanicles and blends and groceryand online spiked. In Germany, for example, per capital consumption ofteas and botanicles increased by an average two leaders to seventy leaders per person peryear. Market Research Firm technologia writes that, quote, consumption of tea for residentialuses significantly growing, as consumers are continuously seeking changes in their lifestyles andfood habits and experimenting with cuisines and beverages. Moreover, the rising at home consumptionof tea is expected to grow at a steady rate owing to increasing urbanizationand the changing eating habits of consumers across the world. And quote, technolgiowrites that recent growth rates of three to four point five percent per year willaccelerate to six percent and greater for the specialty tea market. Through two thousandand twenty six, the segment will add five point five billion in sales fromtwo thousand and twenty one to two thousand and twenty six, according to PechNavio. In contrast, boat tea is prescted to have a challenging year,according to ICRA and the Associated Chambers of Commerce of India. In a jointreport titled Tea Industry at the Cross road, the Chambers of Commerce predicted that decliningprices and increasing energy and labor costs will be a drag on financial performance. I SRA, a vice president of corporate sector ratings, Kashik DAS,says, quote, players who are focused on producing quality teas are likely towitness a much lower decline this year, as average auction prices of teas manufacturedfrom own garden leaves of the top fifty estates in a psalm and the doorshave witnessed a decline of only eight point five percent, against a decline oftwenty five percent for the overall auction average during the first half of fiscal twothousand and twenty two and vote in north...

India prices during the first half ofthe fiscal year to climb twenty three percent year over year, a drop ofsixty rupeas per kilo on average. Compared to two thousand and twenty declines areeven more severe and the bought leaf segment, dominated by smallholders. Averages in thatsegment fell seventy seven rupees per kilo on average, down thirty three percentyear over year. In Kenya, auction prices dropped eight percent to two dollarsand eighteen cents per kilo in the twelve months ending July first globally, teaproduction has now returned to pre pandemic totals increasing thirteen percent during the first sixmonths of two thousand and twenty one as growers in India and Sri Lanka adjustedto the pandemic. Output in two thousand and twenty one is expected to topfifteen percent. In Sri Lanka and India has so far produced a hundred millionmore kilos of tea than during the same period last year. Output in Kenyato climb by ten percent, but exports there of grew nineteen percent, keepingdemand and supply in balance. Business inside, the most notable change in two thousandand twenty two is a growing impact of production deficits. The Economist IntelligenceUnit first reported tea deficits in two thousand and nineteen and two thousand and twentyand now forecast demand will exceed supply in two thousand and twenty two and twothousand and twenty three by four hundred and twenty seven thousand metric tons. Theshort fall of a few hundred thousand metric tons will not lead to shortages inthe grocery isle, but when combined with the cumulative harm from climate change andwith food inflation at record levels, disrupting the long standing equilibrium will certainly firmup prices that had fallen well below the long term average of two dollars andeighty five cents per kilo. Business Inside Shore Lanka is heading for a fall. Fertilis, are banned earlier in the year, is now available, butthe cost has risen from one fifteen hundred rupees a kilo to six thousand sixhundred rupees, about thirty three dollars per kilo and rising. A ban onthe herbicide glass of fate that was he's in November was reversed in December.Output recovered in two thousand and twenty one, but that recovery is highly unlikely tocontinue due to ongoing economic problems, with widespread protests by farmers over thecost of food and unions pressing for big wage increases. Shri Lanka, wheretea is hand plucked, as the highest...

...cost of production in the world,averaging two hundred and sixty nine repeats about the dollar thirty three per kilo.Legendary auction, how Seth Abe's concluded its first rare tea and tea where auctionsin Hong Kong. This week. Sales totaled four million Hong Kong dollars forthe tea's reserved prices approached one million Hong Kong dollars for Poware, some agefor more than a century. Tea Ware as old as a thousand years wasfeatured in a parallel auction titled Echoes Of Fragrance, Tea Culture from the Tangto the Ching dynasties. Sales of teaware totaled four point three million Hong Kongdollars, about five hundred and fifty two thousand us. The online catalog includeda one nineteen hundred Chen young help where cake and a one thousand nine hundredand fifty Gie Jane Blue Labeled Tea, the soul for five hundred and sixtytwo thousand, five hundred Hong Kong dollars, about seventy two thousand us. Bidsfor a one thousand nine hundred thirty seven basket of Sun Yi Shun AgeLeland tea opened at two hundred and forty thousand Hong Kong dollars and sold forthree hundred thousand, about thirty eight thousand us. A bit of five hundredthousand Hong Kong dollars is equivalent to about sixty five thousand US dollars, andwhile that threshold was met for only the rarest of teas, all but twoof the twenty four lots were sold. Several of the more recent teas,including a one thousand nine hundred and eighty five snow label, sold for ahundred and twelve thousand five hundred Hong Kong dollars, about Fourteenzero us. Thecompanion tea where auction featured sixty three lots, including Jian black glaze bowl dating backeight hundred years to the Song Dynasty, and a rare iron red Crane Cupdated to the Arraign of Emperor Huchang. In the fifteen hundreds, toumuku patterns, including a Hare's fur that sold for a hundred eighty nine thousand HongKong dollars and a partridge feather that sold for four hundred and three thousand dollars. Also purchase were Sullivan Cups and stands, you Shang two pots and a carvedTixie, the lacquered tea bowl that sold for five hundred twenty nine thousandtwo hundred Hong Kong dollars, about seventy thousand dollars us. During the TangDynasty, beginning about fourteen hundred years ago,...

...tea was boiled and served as asoup, while with condiments. Examples from that period include conical tea bowls, unique utensils, tea caddies and trays. Winning Bids Range from about twenty fivethousand Hong Kong dollars to fifty thousand dollars, about six thousand U S. and now a word from our sponsor, q trade understands that a successful teablend goes beyond the creative fusion of appearance, a Roma and flavor.Our Multi Award winning product development team is passionate about converting natural ingredients into sensoryexperiences that customers crave. Every recipe is formulated with a commercial backbone of dependablequality sourcing. With a pricing structure that supports a safe, regulated, profitableand scalable the plant. Que Trade meets every brand's retail, food service ande commerce need. For more information, visit our website, que trade tea'Scomthis way, Tibiz travels to Asheville, North Carolina, to meet teaware Potterand Seramist Mary Cotterman. Mary discusses the artisan spirit and state of mind ofthose embracing native clay and how covid nineteen lockdowns forced to attention like a monk, and men who a psalm India to here. Part two of the seriesfrugal innovation in this segment are Vinda an etheraman explores the application of frugal innovationin the tea garden and factories. Shakib, a MoD of Collie Bar Tea Estate, explains that quote objective data changes the conversation in the factory from vagueconcepts to threshold and parameters. It makes operations scientific so that we can improve. Mary Cotterman's twelve when she learned to throw clay on a potter's wheel andthe decade since that will never stop for this accomplished tea where artisan. Intwo thousand and fifteen, Mary moved to China to learn from the old mastershow to make clay pots and the style of Shau Joe, Gung Fu andto speak Mandarin. She next studied at the Mingdoy you win production studio,with a residency at Shawn Bao international ceramics village and seeing Darjan, the homeof porcelap for seventeen hundred years. She next spent a year learning from amaster in the Beijing School, becoming the...

...first Westerner to throw sholahou teapots.In two thousand and eighteen, Mary returned to the United States after a longsojourn across Europe. She makes her home in Ashville, North Carolina, whereyou will find her crafting water jars, pitchers, tea cups, selad onGay Wans and ash glaze. Japanese styles quisue tea pots in a wood firedkiln. By Day, she forages for local plants studies traditional folk ways andearth based practices. Mary year arrival in Nashville anchors the western end of abridge that spans Europe and leads to ancient China, where you spent several yearslearning Gung Fu style pottery, than speaking the native language of porcelain and usingclay. Will you describe for listeners the state of artisan to where in theUS? Tea where in the US is very interesting because it is similar reflectionof the amalgamation of all these different tea traditions from throughout the world. Butwherever tea goes it creates its own unique culture based on how the people inthe region live. In the US we've got the British tea where, whichis what most everybody's familiar with. A lot of US Seram assists make teawhere and teapots in that style. I don't make that kind. I specializein small Chinese teapots. As the tea community gets more educated and broadens,people are bringing in and getting excited about tea where from different places. Sogoing Fu Cha Chinese tea service is becoming quite popular in the United States andthroughout the world. To me it's a really lovely experience that people are gettingmore and more familiar with pouring tea in this way, which is really excitingto me because it lends an aspect of ritual to people's lives that I thinkwe miss a lot in our, quote, Kittie and daily lives, but becausewe're rushing to and fro. So the Chinese tea service really invokes thissense of process and ritual. I also make Japanese style q sue pots,which are sort of the low side handled teapots with the big openings, becausethey're typically used for green tea and so a lot of steam needs to beable to escape the opening and you don't want your pot getting too hot.As people get familiarized with the different styles of tea and regents from all overthe world, they're really starting to collect tea where from all over. Onyour website you mentioned that every gussil contains the wisdom you absorbed from around theworld. How do you see the wisdom...

...manifest in your work? That isa good question. The foundation is functionality, because for me, no matter howit looks, if I'm making a piece of Ta are, it needsto be a precise tool for pouring tea. So a lot of my design personallyI take from traditional Chinese vessels, but I have learned small techniques andvernacular styles from all over. I've been doing some wood firing recently, whichis a really magical process, very labor intensive. That style of wood ashlays was kind is kind of taken to its height in Japan. It's doneall over the world, but the particular long firings in very hot kilns forthe buildup of wood ash to create this really natural glaze is a long standingJapanese tradition. I think of lineage a lot as in so far as acraftsperson there's a gift that you're given by your teachers, especially with pottery.It's difficult and it's a it's a steep learning curve and you can practice formany, many, many years and still not be an expert. Will youdescribe the artist and spirit and state of mind of those embracing native clay tomake teapots and tea where in the US and elsewhere? This is a reallyinteresting area of exploration because it is at once new in that we're trying tobe more ecologically friendly in our artists and practices. We're trying to be climateconscious in our practices so that we can continue making pottery as humanity always has. But it is also something that is historical. Throughout the world's pottery artisansgather around natural sources of clay and each source of clay has its own lifestory. Eaching clay is very touted and it's incredible and it's very good forwhat it is, but it is not special in its uniqueness. Every nativeclay has unique properties based on its life story. The mineral composition and whatbacteria is in the soil will affect how it can be worked. So Ithink the Artistan spirit of working with native clay is integral to pottery itself becausewe are finding that relationship between the earth and US, between the life storyof the clay that began on the top...

...of the mountain and degraded down,eroded rocks, eroded over millions of years, added in plants have their plant materialin there that create bacteria and then it gets deposited in a place whereyou can go and dig it and there's many, multiple ways you can usethis in the process. You can make things out of native clay and youcan also use them as slip or decorating or crush up rocks to using glades. It's really all about coming back to the origins while also looking forward toa sustainable practice shrills with thriving committity of artists. How has covid impacted thearts community there in general, and you as were too? artisome. OurStudio, which is a big warehouse that's subdivided into different studios, was shutdown for a few months. Not being able to get my hands on playwas pretty tough. It's a really deep source of grounding and a spiritual connectiontoo, for me also to have a studio practice, so that part washard. Once our studio opened back up in summer of two thousand and twenty, it was pretty normal and my sales. Thankfully, as a small business,we're doing pretty well. I think people were getting stimulus checks in theUS. They were putting those to good use and really super grateful for thetea community that I've mostly haven't met most of you, but you're all onlineall over the world and really just showed up for the small businesses in thetea community in a really inspiring way. As far as the tea places here, I think I think everyone sort of had to suddenly become more online anddo different things like subscription services and, you know, selling more loose tea. I know for some of the sit down businesses it's quite rough. Everybody'smade it to the downhill side intact from the tea businesses that I know.Personally, as a creative person, it was really nice to have the socialpressure taken off because I have some social anxiety and so being social, whileI love it and it's very important to me, definitely takes a lot ofenergy for me. So during Covid I definitely went into a monk like creativestate because all I was doing was staying at home with my dog and mysweetheart and then sort of meditating for hours on end in the studio, silent, almost nobody else in there. So it was a really lovely time wherethe whole world slowed down and I could just tune in and listen really deeply. The craft. Frugal innovation is an...

...umbrella tom under its any innovation thathas the risk and high safety and reliabilities included. In India, Davetna BISSAZATICAhas been working on these projects with successful pilots. If your partners sits.In Pot one we looked at frugal innovation and tea buying and selling. Continuingfrom there we look at frugal innovation and this application of the tea gotten teaplant. Should keep am of Kali about t stage in Assam. Talks aboutsome of these experiments, but she keep as pilot. is several projects inthe field. It's in the factory. He says that they've seen the biggestimpact. With his data, I have an objective source of attention to detail. I don't have to depend on someone who has been working in the teaindustry for forty years to use his expertise and muscle memory to guide us.I have objective data and that really helps me change the conversation in the factory. I'm not talking of vague concepts, I'm talking of numbers. I'm talkingthis is the parameter that we want and we have to keep it within thisthreshold, and that's that really. It makes it scientific. Then what happens? Even the youngest boy or girl who's joining as an executive, he orshe can take it up very quickly. She doesn't have to be there fortwenty years. So now we have a young lady in one of our factoriesin Dobba. She's running or twelve are shift by herself and it's just data. She has the data. He knows that we have to stay within theseparameters and the quality is good, so safe and she's got he's in ours. So normally guys running factories at that, at that level, theywill be, you know, in the late s and s because you needto have that much experience. But if, if we can objectify data, wecan have younger blood come in quickly and the parameter is it. There'smore transparency, because it was very opaque before as to which who is performingwell in your management team who is not, because it was all objective. NowI have peer numbers. I'd say this is the parameter I want inthe factory. These are the numbers. Keep it within these threshold you getgood tea. So they are also not operating blind and I'll just telling themmake good tea and telling them this machine should be running from this mons tothis much. We have a sensor. It'll tell you this process, thismanufacturing process, will run from this much to this much parameter. You havea method that we have given you to measure it scientific objectively. You recorded. You record it, share it in our shared platforms we have. Wehave it on a cloud based platform where we shared the data and we keepverifying it and based on that we can...

...it stays within a regiment, sowe're not there are many little things in production where, in a way wewere operating blind and now we have a certain level of clarity. So thatreally helps US improve. She keeps using temperature meters in the factory. Incidentally, this was developed by a young boy at a cost that I was youonly will say is laughable. Three machines are idy in one of them isthat she keeps factory attention to detail, which was one subjective, has nowbecome scientific and objective. She keep lins processing tea to cooking and how,by tweaking temperatures in the APM of machines, the quality of tea changes exponentially.These innovations are sense of base and are already news in other industries.She keep reminds me that the color sort as in Orthodox te production were derivedfrom rice satters. The course of my conversation with a bidgets. We discusspeople, Welfare, productivity and speaking a little productivity, he says it's notbecause people are shying away from work but because of the nature of the work. Yet times when I have student the Gardens in Augustin and it is sohot that you know, I I myself, you know, could not stand modernforty five minutes to an hour before, you know, I felt unwell.These people do a day in there. So you know, it's it's difficultand I know, I don't think anybody talks about this. So Isometimes feel that in order that so much of high and you know about,you know, the romance of when carrying the bags of central actually realize whatgoes on. In that case it's like a funnest. And that we talkedabout harvesters to most of the harvesting machines, he explains, are handheld machines andthey tend to be noisy and heavy to carry there, for men areassigned the machines. Not only is a tiring work, but it's hard tokeep one's hand steady with them. This means the quality of the plucking isnot going to be very good. Terrain poses another challenge, with harvesters,even in a PSAM's valleys, whereas it isn't uneven terrain, and this challengeis amplified in the hills. So when a big talks about harvesters, butnot to increase quantity but as a means to aid quality, he's looking attwo major deliverables. One is the quality of the finely plucked leaf. Shouldbe at least five eggs better than what is plucked by current machines and atleast two eggs better than what has been plucked by hand. And the secondpriority on the field is pests. The cost of pest and disease controls huge, especially when there are large areas to monitor, which is the case withthe estates that run into many hectares. BESTS can spread within two to threedays, offering a very small window to arrest the spread, and early warningsystem, says she keep, can make a difference. However, this seemsto be a mammoth task, perhaps the most challenging space to build innovation,because for every pest a year's worth of data needs to be collected to feedtheir algorithms. But nowhere in the conversation do we turn to talk about machineis replacing people with always about utilizing labor...

...effectively to increase output and with betterquality, because ultimately it comes down to the perennial problem of oversupply and reduceddemand and the mad scramble for markets. INDIANTE producers do not make to order, but make to stock, the priorities to sell. The circle that beginswith variability in quality of t closes with variability in press realization. A metwo order will bring other advantages, as it's collaborative and brings both technical andtechnological inputs as part of the process. I think the TT industry supply chainis completely out of Synk. It the way you know modern supply chains work. Okay, there is no concept of me to order or very filled withit. They will say that you know, of our contracts are made to order. I beg to disagree, because you know when you say that youknow I will take a t from you. You will say, I will takea tea of a particular quality from you. Okay, and that guy, you know, guy who's making it, is in many cases not even awareof what you want. So so, because a bit of your ability hereand there, you have to ability to reject okay. So without specificationsfrom the quality bus, I don't think it to order. Is that right? So that's my take. You know, people will disagree, which is fine, okay, but I think one of the most important things of meto order is to leverage the most unique aspects of a state or a factorythat has consumer value. So every garden, you know, every garden or everyfactory will have something which is unique, you know, to a particular toa particular market or to particular set of consumers likes. For example,somebody might make very good you know what color okay, which is ideal.It was sort of lend in Maharashtra, or, you know, to godry, or somebody make very good you know after taste. You know whatthe good drop is called, as meethoppen, naturally sweet m okay, which comesbasically from the from the area that comes in and very good quality manufacture. So on this we are able to actually, you know, you know, just you know, treat every garden as unique and not as of abodity. Well, this is a familiar story of not treating teas commodity.A pichy offers a road map of sorts. That's possible because of frugal innovation.Once you have the quality specifications are producer can do real time monitoring duringmanufacturing. All the resources are then focused on producing only what meets suspects.This, in turn optimizes the cost of production and increases the likelihood of thecustomer buying it because it's made to their specifications. This turns the focus tobuyers, because ultimately the change has to begin with them. If the largeteam buyers are procuring, say one thou million kilos of Ta Year, asyou may, and average pretty state produces one million kilos of tea, that'sOnezero four hundred estates. That can geter...

...to a single buyer, and changecan begin with one single buyer. This too is seen in action. Sortof talks about how he's piloting the Mike to order model his partner with abuyer who's agree to buy his state a higher than every hitch price and inreturn, sort of assure team of quality, which is achieved by managing the parameterswhen processing in the factory, consistency, which is ensured by recording data suchas temperature and moisture levels, safety, which is being done by educating roleson chemical usage and monitoring it. They may not be certifications here,but data is being recorded digitally and is being analyzed, and for those whohave wondered the alternative to expensive certifications, this may well be it, becausethe proof is there for anyone to see. She keep talks about how the conversationsare changing and becoming more specific. Is Helping him build a young teamwho are learning, who are not a verse to technology and who rays offocused on quality. Innovation, he says, is no longer just for multinationals butfor everyone. The larger outcome is most significant, because frugal innovation willchange the way the industry has run. Will no longer be about waiting foran executive to invest thirty for two years in the factory to be relied uponto run it. It can bring effective processes into play in a way thatsomeone young can be trained early on, and this is important. In statelike Asama, migration is extremely high and the intellectually able who leave don't return. The work on trugal innovation is made possible by harnessing experience, a widenetwork and an active collaboration with academia and industry. Support and partnerships have alreadycome from jort buyers. The possibilities were technic play are vast and both chickyand sort of seed. As a way forward, coming with an open mind, advice is to keep it needs a willingness to try piloting the various optionsand because it's been designed to be frugal innovation, it's affordable even by smallgrowers and Small Gardens. Sort of confesses that he didn't buy into it readily, but the potential to earn a better price for the tea he was makingwas a strong pull. All it took was a month before he could startseeing that it was working, and he's since been advocating it for an industrythat's been grappling with multiple challenges. throughgle innovations a low risk and impactful option. It spearheaded by an industry veteran. Every successful experiment there are many thatfail, but these two are essential to the process that begins with a question. What if, intrigued by what you heard in today's podcast, would youlike to learn more from our global network of Tebis journalists and t experts?Remember to visit the TV is website for more comprehensive coverage. That's wwwt BizBiz alcol thanks for listening. Farewell till next week.

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