Tea Biz
Tea Biz

Episode · 1 year ago

Interview with Lisa See

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Author Lisa See has led a remarkable life in tea. Her great-great grandfather worked his way from a laborer on the transcontinental railroad to become a leader in the prosperous Chinatown in Los Angeles a century ago. Listen as she discusses how tea has influenced her life.

This Week Tea Biz travels to California to meet Lisa C, author of the acclaimed bestselling novel the tea girl of Hummingbird Laye. Lisa is the keynote speaker at the University of California at Davis's sixth global tea initiative coloquium, an online event January twenty one. She and research partner Linda Lewis discuss how a trip to tea mountain inspired her novel. Visit Global Tea dot you see Davis Dot eedu to register attendance is free. New York Times Best Selling Author Lisa C discusses how her daily tea drinking rituals connect her with the broader story of tea. My Name is Jessica and a Tale Willard. I'm a tea writer based in Victoria, British, Columbia Canada. Join me for a conversation with Lisa...

...as we discuss the role of tea in history, culture, art and daily life. When you contemplate tea, it's history, production, commerce and cultural practices old and new. You see how influential it's been throughout history. So, Lisa, how do you think tea influences this are view of the world. Well, you know, and I think it depends on where you are in the world right. I mean, tea is the second most popular drink in the world after water, and in some countries you know that it is really important. China, obviously, in the Turkey, you know, different places around the world. However, in a place like the United States, it's obviously a distant cos been way after you know, water than coffee.

Then maybe, I don't know, Cocacola or something. So I think it really depends on where you live and how important it is within your your own culture. Mean, you know, here in the United States we don't really have that tradition of afternoon teatime, if you're if we're like more of an English tea drinker, or just even the idea of having a glass jar with tea that you carry with you throughout the day. So it really just began. Depends on where you are. But I think for those places and those cultures where tea is really central to life, that you're right, just even with your question, that it touches on all aspects of your life. It's it's about taste, it's about aroma, it's about how you feel on that particular day. It's about the connections some of us, not all of us, will make two poetry and art and to nature. So I you know,...

I just know from myself. I drink tea every day and in the you know, sometimes the night before, sometimes that that morning, I'll start thinking about what kind of tea do I want to drink today? You know what, what am I going to start with, and that it really becomes something that is really connected to my own emotions and to just, you know, where I am in life at that moment. Do I want something really kind of life and fresh? Do I want something that's really rich and deep and flavor? Do I want a tea that, you know, like an old Luer, that is really will take me into history, you know, just by tasting it? So you've touched on how different cultures have different traditions around tea and different practices. What do you think about tea's ability to connect...

...different cultures? So what role does tea play in blurring some of those boundaries? I've often reminded of this line from lynnw come, who wrote there is something in the nature of tea that leads us into a world of quiet contemplation, of light and I think that that's true, that it that if you're experiencing tea or tea traditions from other countries or other cultures, it does kind of force you to slow down and think about that culture, where that tea came from, the physical labor involved. When I having now, you know, spent time in the tea mountains, I I will never ever take a cup of tea for granted again. You know, I will always, when I'm pulling out the leaves and looking a the leaves, I will think about...

...all the people who touch those leaves before they came to me, and there's something to me, very powerful about that. You know that you have the pickers, you have the people who cross you know every leaf pick by hand, the people who process it, that the women who sit with those big trays and you know they're they're sorting at leaf by leaf by leaf. To me again, it just it really forces me to slow down and think about what went into this cup that I'm enjoying. So it sounds like tea is part of your daily tradition. What is it about teeth that fascinates you and that that you have chosen to make tea part of your daily life. I really I hate to keep going back to the personal, but maybe that's the right place to be in the sense that, and I can already mention this, about slowing down, but I think part of that slowing down is really...

...about looking inward, to really you know, earlier I said you know, when I wake up in the morning or even the night before, I'll think about what P do I want to drink today, you know, and you know, I don't drink just the same tea all day. Sometimes I'll switch to three different ones depending on the time of day and depending on how I feel. But that also means I have to think about what do I want now, how do I feel? What do I need? I think maybe that's it. What do I need today? What do I need this morning? What do I need this afternoon? What do I need tonight before I go to bed? You know, it's such a sort of new agey phrase, but it's really about mindfulness right that you're actually having to think about who you are and where you are in that moment before you even make that choice of what you want to drink. Remember to visit the t Biz website for...

...more comprehensive coverage. That'sh W A WWT BIZCOM THANKS FOR LISTENING.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (73)